Induction FAQ

Are my pans suitable for induction use?

Why do my “induction ready” pans not work on my induction hob?

How does an induction hob work?

Are my pans suitable for induction use?

The basic rule of thumb, is to test whether the base of your pan is magnetic, if yes it should work on your induction hob.

Why do my “induction ready” pans not work on my induction hob?

There is a slim possibility that your smaller pans/coffee pots (pans with a base diameter of less than 130mm) may not work on your induction hob. This is due to the variation of certain safety circuits within each manufactures hob. Most hob manufactures have indentified this as an issue and have amended their settings to allow a 130mm induction based saucepan to work.

How does an induction hob work?

Under the cooking surface there is an electrical coil that creates a magnetic field and the induction current generated excites the molecules in the vessel ( so long as the vessel is made from a ferrous/magnetic material), which in turn directly heats the cookware.

Unlike other forms of cooking, heat is generated directly in the pot or pan (cooking vessel), as opposed to being generated in the stovetop by electrical coils or burning gas.

Induction cookers are faster and more energy-efficient than traditional electric hobs. They allow instant control of cooking energy similar to gas burners. Because induction heats the cooking vessel itself, the possibility of burn injury is significantly less.You will never have to scrape off any burnt on stains. There are no flames or red-hot electric heating elements as found in traditional cooking equipment.

Since heat is being generated by an induced electric current, the unit can detect whether cookware is present (or whether its contents have boiled dry) by monitoring how much power is being absorbed. That allows such functions as keeping a pot at minimal boil or automatically turning an element off when cookware is removed from it.
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